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Roasted Grape Vinaigrette

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I hated grapes as a kid but I made an exception for them if they were peeled. Yes, I was that kid and it still pertains to some tannic skinned fruits today. I also didn’t like the seeds which just made me all kinds of high maintenance for my mom when trying to get me to eat them – whether it be an afternoon snack or snook into my Marvel comic laced lunch box.5b9e1356-8d89-4234-978c-d4cf317d2f31

aac18d07-cd28-4cbb-970a-25da0a8e3c62And then when I was around 6 or 7, I’m not sure, we found out that I was allergic to everything that bloomed or breathed in nature. It was a rough life as a kid but it was a good life nonetheless, once you find out all the things you’re allergic to, you simply calculate your next move, like chess, and carry-on. There were moments when I’d reach for something and forget to read the label, a few arm scratches later and all my senses were aroused and I was scrambling for Benadryl and a puff of my inhaler. Yes, allergies and asthma is no fun as an energetic youth who had a passion for life the way I did. But I survived and I’m here to tell you all about it.

These days my allergies have somewhat tamed down. I no longer require a weekly visit to get allergy shots and I am able to eat half of the foods I used to be allergic to. So I occasionally enjoy a handful of grapes as long as they’re washed thoroughly – because I learned that with some of my allergies it was about the tree or vine that the fruit itself grew on…interesting huh?3fa33a5e-400a-4597-8750-3ea5fef82c62

I later learned that it was called OAS, Oral Allergy Syndrome, and it happens when one eats  raw or uncooked fruit. You can read more about it here. Once I discovered that it had a name, life became a little bit easier and I was like give me all the fruit pie I can stand! And one frustrating thing about the allergy is that I didn’t always have symptoms – it happened when I was about 7 or 8 years of age. And till this day, there are those days where I all I long for is a juicy peach or sweet gala apple to be devoured in the palm of my hand.

I won’t even tell you about how heartbroken I was when tomatoes got thrown in to the mix…le sigh. Any who, I’m done depressing you about my allergy problems, let’s get to the roasted grape vinaigrette. I really hope you all will give this a try. It’s really delicious and I believe that it would be great on/in a variety of things from salads, wraps to your yogurt bowl (yes, your yogurt bowl).2de95a07-f590-422b-8f58-8bb9f9e19256

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Roasted Grape Vinaigrette

1.5-2 lbs seedless grapes
1/3 cup red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons granulated sugar (optional)
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 tsp kosher salt (to taste)

Method

1.Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Remove your grapes from the vine, rinse them thoroughly and pat them dry. Place them in a bowl and toss them in 1 tablespoon oil, and sprinkle a about a teaspoon of salt making sure that everything is coated evenly. Pour onto a sheet pan and roast for about 16-20 minutes, or until skin begins to wrinkle and juices begin to caramelize on the pan. I used my Williams-Sonoma Gold Touch non-stick pan for easy clean up.

2. Once the grapes are room temp or completely cooled, transfer them into a blender with the oil and puree until smooth. There is no need to stream in your oil. Scrape down the sides and once your puree is nice and smooth, add your vinegar, sugar and a little salt as you go until it is seasoned to your liking.

3. Transfer your vinaigrette to an airtight container and keep it in your fridge, it will keep a little over a week if you let it last that long.

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Roasted Radishes & Garlic Aioli

radish recipes, roasted radishes, garlic aioli, personal chef, caterer, Nashville TN, food photography, vsco photosThe winter entered through the back door a little prematurely. Autumn was slowly taking steps backward to make way for the hues of blue, the last leaves to fall away from the branches of soon-to-be withered trees. You know, the ones that cast shadows behind the street lights at night. I’ve become used to hearing the wailing of those who lament winter’s arrival; grumbling  about how their desire for summer to come back because the spring time wreaks havoc on their allergies.

Roasted Radishes : The Salted Table dot com

 

roasted radishes, The Salted Table, food blog, personal chef, caterer, eat local

 

Roasted Radishes : The Salted Table dot comAs a child I had both allergies and asthma, two diseases that still bring me grief today. But I still have an appreciation for every season because the details are different; and the arrival of spring blooms versus the color change of the leaves in autumn are all things to be appreciated. And winter’s vegetables are some of my favorite to consume. The vibrant shades of cabbage nestled against the neutrals of potatoes and a splash of hearty greens all ready to be made into delectable soups, stews and pickled things if you’re skilled enough to take on the challenge.

Roasted Radishes : The Salted Table dot comI was a strange kid if you were to inquire from the right family members. I was a lover of all vegetables with the exception of okra, it had to be fried and practically burnt for me to find it palatable. Of course, I’ve since matured and adore it fried or pickled, but still slightly burnt (old habits die-hard). But enough of memory lane, lets talk radishes. My only familiarity with radishes growing up was at church potlucks on crudités platters and they were always the last thing left, along with celery. They were more oft than not left behind on salad bars and strewn to the side of the plate like the family member you wanted to avoid at all cost due to lack of personality. In culinary school we carved them into flowers during garde manger, shaved over salads as an a la minute need for a burst of color. I’ve only ever known them to be the red-headed stepchild of the cruciferous family…tis a shame.

Roasted Radishes : The Salted Table dot com

 

Roasted Radishes : The Salted Table dot comThe recipe I’m sharing with you today I hope changes your mind about these guys…or gals. I rather enjoy introducing radishes to my clients in this format and I have yet to see anyone shy away from giving them a try. It’s so simple and yet so rewarding-ly delicious – just a little bit of olive oil, kosher salt and fresh ground black and you’re in business. This same method works well with carrots, rutabagas, parsnips and other hearty veggies as well.

You simply give your radishes a little rinse to remove any dirt that may be still hanging around. If your radishes have the greens attached, don’t trash them, simply give them a little rinse as well and saute them with a little salt, pepper and oil for a snack or toss them in your next salad. Place your radishes in a mixing bowl, roughly about two cups worth – that have been rinsed and quartered depending upon their size, you may want to cut them in half if they are the bigger ones. And I know that there is a plethora of radishes out there on the market so use your best judgment on what size you want to cut them. Just make sure that they are uniform so that they cook evenly. So place them in your mixing bowl with two gracious tablespoons of olive oil, 1 teaspoon of kosher salt and a healthy dousing of cracked black pepper. Roast them on 425 for 20-35 minutes, or until the skin begins to wrinkle and you see a little caramelization start to take place on the white flesh. You may want to stir them around with a wooden spatula halfway through cooking. Once they’re finish, let them hang out for a moment or two before you eat them.

Roasted Radishes : The Salted Table dot comI decided to make a little garlic aioli to eat them with and used the cheaters guide to make this rather quickly. I cracked and peeled three cloves of garlic and sautéed it in a skillet with a tablespoon of olive and a little salt and pepper until the garlic was aromatic and began to caramelize a little. Once I got a good amount of color on the garlic about two minutes on medium heat – I set that mixture to the side to let it cool. I pulled out my food processor and put three heavy tablespoons of Duke’s mayo in there with two dashes of Texas Pete hot sauce, a squeeze of lemon juice (1 tbsp), the garlic with the oil that it cooked in and a dash of Worcestershire. I flipped the switch and let those ingredients come together, scraping down the sides once or twice to incorporate all the ingredients. Once I was happy with the consistency I tasted it for salt and pepper.

The rest is history friends, you have your delicious roasted radishes and a delectable condiment to dip or slather them in and all is right in the world. I hope this inspires you to give it a try next time you’re at the grocer or have some hanging out in the fridge.Roasted Radishes : The Salted Table dot com

A Trip To Stouffer’s Test Kitchen: ‘Kitchen Cupboard’ Commitment

Stouffer's Open Kitchen: Travel Blogger

Stouffers Open Kitchen, Travel Blogger, Black Bloggers, Food Photography, Personal Chef

What is it about the combination of sweet and savory tomato sauce dancing around with a blend of rich nutty cheeses intermingled with a joyous melody of herbs and spices that make you feel like you’re a kid again? Lasagna to me was like the Super Bowl of meals because my mom didn’t make it often. So when we saw that box of lasagna sheets setting on the counter, we knew it was happening and the anticipation began to build. But I won’t lie to you and pretend like there were always gourmet 3-course meal at my dinner table growing up – there wasn’t, but we ate pretty well if you consider the fact that both of my parents worked full-time jobs. And it seems that we often want to give frozen foods a bad wrap as though they haven’t made their way to our kitchen tables, t.v. trays, or even the comfort of our beds a few times.

I recently received an invitation to visit the Stouffer’s Test Kitchen in Solon, Ohio to get a behind the scenes look at how they create some of the best frozen meals on the market. We also learned that Stouffer’s would be launching a campaign called the ‘Kitchen Cupboard Commitment‘, which vows that they are using the same ingredients that you would find in your pantry at home. Did you hear that?…no preservatives or unnecessary additives folks! And they are starting the process with their beloved lasagna. So you can pick their product out of your frozen food section without batting an eyelash. How sweet is that? I mean, talk about having a piece of mind when purchasing groceries for yourself and loved ones.

Stouffer's Open Kitchen: Travel Blogger

It was an eye-opening experience into the passion and commitment that goes in to getting these meals onto your table. We were treated like royalty on this two-day trip and the food provided by the Test Kitchen Chefs was nothing short of fantastic. And I’m pretty critical when it comes to what I eat, well, if you exclude my penchant for gummy bears and chocolate (wink). We got the opportunity to work side-by-side with the chefs to see how they prepared the lasagna, and the best part is that we broke off in to groups to make the different types of lasagna and then we got to try them all – win!

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We also learned the history of the Stouffer’s family and did you know that it all started with a small coffee shop where they sold sandwiches and buttermilk? Not to mention, we accrued a handful of fun facts and stories about how the brand grew to what is today. After spending some time asking the staff questions and hearing the stories of how they came to love the product and brand; it was clear that Stouffer’s is more than a boxed meal on a frosty shelf. It is apart of people’s lives and every box is connected to a memory.

Stouffer's Open Kitchen

On day two, we had the honor of learning a some food photography skills from some of my favorite people in life, Will and Susan of House of Brinson. If you aren’t familiar with this uber-talented duo of food/life-style photographers then you should make some French press and head over to their website (Thank me later!).

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I know you might be thinking, “Yeah, yeah. You were paid to say these things.” And while yes, the entire trip was paid for by Nestle, this is indeed a product and company I don’t mind recommending to you, the reader. The marketing and branding were as transparent as they could be with answering our questions. And please believe we questioned everything from GMO to salt and fat content in the products. And I always encourage people when purchasing new or old products – to always flip it over and read the ingredient list, google the words you don’t understand, write letters to the companies of whose products you consume. The products that you have to choose from are direct result of what we as the public are asking for, so if we don’t demand higher quality then we won’t receive it. And I’m telling you that your fears of being fed unhealthy  products is being challenged by companies like Stouffer’s.

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If you are a part of the demographic whose never experienced a frozen Stouffer’s product, consider this a prompt to give their lasagna a try, or maybe some enchiladas. When you find a product that you enjoy – you too, will become a part of the family that Stouffer’s has created worldwide. Did I forget to mention that they sent me lasagna on my birthday? Yeah, talk about a happy guy! You can find more info about their products here and check out this video below of the Open Kitchen Event, you may see a familiar face.

 

Huntsville Restaurant Week & The Food Blogger Tour – #DineHSV

Fried Green Tomatoes via Grille 29It’s no surprise that the south contributes an eccentric flair to the culinary scene with its rich history and no shortage of immigrant influences. I simply couldn’t imagine my life without southern food or the hospitality for that matter and it comes without saying that Huntsville, Alabama wasn’t short on either. Last weekend I took a little three-day mini-vat down to our Nashville neighbor after being invited by the CVB to explore the food scene in their fare town.

This recent trip to Huntsville was different from what I remember of my last visit some 15 years ago when I was a young one, more than likely – I was being dragged by the parental units to visit extended family. But enough about me, you’re here to find out about the good stuff, like where to eat and what to do? There’s more than 50 local restaurants participating, each one offering a Restaurant Week special. Lunches are set at $5, $10, and $15, while dinners are set at $10, $20, and $30. So there’s no reason why you shouldn’t start meal-planning for the week!

Westin Huntsville - Huntsville, Alabama

First things first, I arrived at the Westin Huntsville Friday afternoon to be greeted with open arms and smiling faces. I arrived a few hours premature to the check-in time due to catching a flight straight to Huntsville from Charlotte, which is a story for another day, I digress. Any-who the staff gave me instruction to make myself comfortable in the lobby while they put the finishing touches on my room, which was more than okay with me since I had learned much about patience in the previous two days.

The room was standard in set-up but what set it apart was the view from all sides (assuming you love sunsets-rises & God’s country), the bed constructed of clouds and the chic shower/bath options. I did miss some of the amenities like a microwave and mini fridge because I love to store cold beverages when I travel and I have a mild addiction with reheating my coffee several times…whatchagonnado?! But I’m elated to tell you that the Westin is currently under-going renovation and the top floors will become a new concept called the Element, which will house some of those familiar home amenities that travelers enjoy!

The Westin staff definitely knew the way to my heart – I received a beautiful tray laden with chocolate truffles and blondie bites from their talented pastry chef & a bottle of Malbec to cap it all off. I was only seconds away from telling my wife, “we’re moving in.”

Later that day, we were off to eat at our first restaurant of the Food Blog Tour to kick off the Huntsville – Madison County Restaurant Week. I was excited to meet some of the other bloggers and get their take on the city’s burgeoning food scene and to see if there were other places off the beaten path that we should visit while in town?

Grille 29 - Roasted Cauliflower Soup

We arrived at Grille 29 located in the Village of Providence which has a rather laid back vibe about it and feels like one of those places the Baptist flood after church, you know what I’m talking’ about – the south y’all! We started the off with a delicious roasted cauliflower soup that I couldn’t stop eating because the texture blew me away. It was light and airy but creamy and rich – all of these things might not seem like they make sense but you have to try it for yourself. Each course complimented the last in a way that you didn’t want the food to stop coming and there’s very few restaurants I would say that about. The fried green tomatoes with pimento cheese studded with a hint of bleu cheese in it and layered with porky-goodness was a well executed offering of the staple adorned across southern menus. The desserts were nothing short of toe-curling pleasantries that you wanted to tuck into your pocket for later, specifically referring to the lemon-curd lava cake (yes, it’s a real thing and you want it!). The staff is excited about the food they serve and Executive Chef Cara knows her flavor combinations. Did I mention the 29 cent mimosas at brunch on Sundays! And the Restaurant Week starts August 12-21, so you want to add this gem to your stop.Lemon-Curd Lava Cake from Grille 29

 

Our next stop on the tour was a place that I could see myself frequenting on a regular basis based on the friendliness and eccentric nature of the restaurant alone. Its the kind of restaurant where you just stop by to say hi and leave with goodies for later just because they are that awesome! I’m talking about none other than the Toybox Bistro, a quirky little joint nestled into a strip of other small businesses including a little coffee/cupcake shop called SugarBelle where I nabbed some nitro coffee ‘for the win.’

Toybox Bistro

Toybox Bistro

You walk into the The Toybox Bistro and you’re not exactly sure what to think because it’s adorned in novelty comics, toys, board games and more. You may even be greeted by Darth Vader’s face while you sip your pale ale at the bar. This eccentric joint is the epitome of nerd-dom and that’s an awesome thing if you ask co-owner Michelle Timon. I thoroughly enjoyed speaking with Michelle and hearing about her desire to give back to the Huntsville community through creative culinary eats and the allowing of everyone to be themselves in the Bistro.

We sat down at the table that would soon be covered with red baskets of poutine (cheese curd and gravy covered fries) and deep-fried wickles (only the best pickle product in a jar you’ll find!).     I learned by this second stop that you have to pace yourself because more food is coming so its best to take your time and let the top button of your pants loose early. We were able to choose between two items for our entrée that would be featured on the restaurant week menu. The first being a PB & Yay Burger, yes a burger with peanut butter – but don’t worry, no jelly is involved; though I’m convinced their culinary is capable of working wonders after trying the burger laced with peanut buttery-goodness! I was under the impression that this stuff only appeared on Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives, not that someone in real-life was actually creating such things – well, it was divine, so you should order two, one for you and one for the one you love. The other option was Toybox’s version of a cordon bleu, a fried chicken sandwich with swiss cheese, sweet ham, and a bacon béchamel which was nothing short of heavenly comfort food amped up by the bacon béchamel. You’ll be elated to know that these items will grace the menu as permanent fixtures after restaurant week is over.

Beignet Cafe - Huntsville, Alabama

Our last stop for the food blogger tour was the Beignet Cafe, a little hole in the wall nestled into a shopping center in the northern area of the city. While the dirty grits, white corn grits with andouille sausage and chicken in a spicy tomato-based creole sauce, were rather tasty, the iced coffee made with Cafe Du Monde coffee and the fluffy perfection of the beignets stole my heart! I’ve never been to New Orleans but I believe in my heart that those pillows of sugary decadence do the originals justice! I’m still dusting powdered sugar off my clothes as we speak…or as I speak, should I say?! ;-] The service was phenomenal and the owner Denise was a gem, sharing with us her inspiration for the restaurant and taking fantastic care of us! You may also choose from a strawberry and feta grilled chicken salad, egg bake, or dirty grits – some options also come with a beignet but trust me, you’ll want to.Beignets from Beignet Cafe in Huntsville, AlabamaYou guys, there was so much to do and see that I won’t overwhelm you in this one post, so stay tuned for part two as my wife and I explored Huntsville a little more. These restaurants are a great start to your restaurant week dining options and you may check out the other bloggers posts below to see more mouth-watering captures of what we dined on!

Katie Actually http://www.katieactually.com/toybox-bistro/
Rocket City Mom http://www.rocketcitymom.com/kid-report-toybox-bistro/
Bo Williams http://bowilliams.com/2016/07/visiting-toy-box-bistro-for-huntsville-restaurant-week-2016/
Sweet T Makes Three http://www.sweettmakesthree.com/places-to-eat-in-huntsville-alabama/

A behind the scene shot for your life, because bloggers y’all!
Photo by the talented Sarah of The Jealous Crumpet. 

Food bloggers at Toybox Bistro for Huntsville Restaurant Week

Disclosure: I was invited to get a sneak peak of the Huntsville Restaurant Week participating locations as a guest of the Huntsville-Madison County Convention & Visitors Bureau. All thoughts and experience opinions posted here are that of my own. Meals were provided as part of this experience.

Grilled Bone-In Ribeye & Garlic Butter Asparagus from America’s Test Kitchen’s Master Of The Grill Cookbook

America's Test Kitchen, Food photography, black chef

I’m not sure why 2016 is in such a rush but it may be causing me to lose track of time. It only seems as though yesterday, I was driving down the highway admiring Spring’s cascade of honeysuckle that laced both sides of the road. It feels like every year, I’m constantly reminding myself to pick honeysuckle to make simple syrup and I never get around to it, but I digress – we’re here to talk grilling.

Why, yes – Summer crept in like a thief in the night and without any apology but I’m not complaining. The Tennessee heat is harassing every brow and back with puddles of perspiration, children are frolicking across freshly mowed lawns and backyards are sending up billowing smoke signal invitations to everyone in the neighborhood. Summer is an open invitation to keep your house cool and your oven in hibernation while the grill carries the load for a while. I’m honored to be partnering with America’s Test Kitchen to share some grilling tips and flawless recipes for your summer entertaining. ATK’s latest addition to their extensive cookbook collection is all about grilling, and it spares no details when it comes to all the tools and knowledge you’ll need to be a Grilling Guru this season.

asparagus, food photography, americas test kitchen, health eating

Grilling, Charcoal, Chimney Starter, ATKgrill

I have a pretty extensive cookbook collection and they all serve one purpose or another, they all have their tips to offer, some, I’m a die-hard believer in and others I take with a grain of salt. But this cookbook, or better yet – ‘guide,’ shall we say, in particular, is pretty much spot on with the techniques and approaches to what I feel is intimidating to the masses.

Americas Test Kitchen, Grilling Food

Ribeye Steak, Recipes, Grilling, Americas Test Kitchen

When I grill I use one-hundred percent all-natural hardwood lump charcoal, I like the flavor it imparts and I’ve used it for so long I couldn’t tell you why I left behind all the other options as it pertains to flavor, but I won’t be changing back anytime soon. I will say that I learned a little something during this process that was never apart of my barbecuing/cookout experiences growing up in East Tennessee. We never used a charcoal chimney – it was simply crumbled up newspaper nestled in the bottom of the grill and the charcoal arranged evenly over the top, a generous squeeze of lighter fluid and dinner was in motion. I must say though, I will never touch lighter fluid again due to my palate still having nightmares about the harsh aftertaste it leaves behind from excessive usage. I prefer the lump charcoal, it burns clean, quick and easy, and the flavor is awesome. But I always encourage everyone to do their research, and find what works for you.

When flipping through the book to find recipes to share with you guys, I wanted to do something different but since whatever I chose to prepare would also be dinner – I went with beef…because beef. I didn’t purchase anything too expensive, I purchased two bone-in ribeye from a local grocer for about twenty-six bucks and a bundle of asparagus for about three bucks. And compared to what we would’ve spent on a steak dinner out, this was a great deal in my book. I cooked the steak to medium but there are instructions in the book to guide you along on how to cook the meat to your preferred temperature. Remember, thermometers are always your best friend when cooking meat, or really most things in the kitchen!

Americas Test Kitchen, Steak Recipes, Grilling

I’ve been reading this book on and off for the last three weeks and I’m amazed at all the info that is crammed into roughly 430 pages, everything you ever wanted to know about seasoning, proper tools, recipe tricks, and more that will definitely equip to you to be a master of the grill. I hope you guys enjoy these two recipes as much as I did. The steak was so full of flavor and juicy, and the asparagus was a garlic-y, buttery dream with a little char for intrigue. Trust me when i say this won’t be just another book that collects dust on the shelf, you can purchase the book here. Cheers to grilling perfection!

Americas Test Kitchen

The Ultimate Steak
2 (1 1/4-to 1 1/2 pound) double-cut bone-in ribeye steaks, 1 3/4 to 2 inches thick, trimmed
4 teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
2 teaspoons pepper

1. Set wire rack in rimmed baking sheet. Pat steaks dry with paper towels and sprinkle all over with salt. Place steaks on prepared rack and let stand at room temperature until meat registers 55 degrees, about 1 hour. Rub steaks with oil and sprinkle with pepper.

2A. FOR A CHARCOAL GRILL Open bottom vent half-way. Arrange 4-quarts unlit charcoal briquettes even layer over half of grill. Light large chimney starter one-third filled with charcoal briquettes(2 quarts). When top coals are partially covered with ash, pour evenly over unlit coals. Set cooking gratin place, cover, and open lid vent halfway. Heat grill until hot, about 5 minutes.

2B. FOR A GAS GRILL Turn all burners high, cover, and heat grill until hot, about 15 minutes. Turn primary burner to medium-low and turn off other burner(s). (Adjust primary burner as needed to maintain grill temperature around 300 degrees.)

3. Clean and oil cooking grate. Place steaks on cooler side of the grill with bones facing fire. Cover and cook until steaks register 75 degrees, 10 to 20 minutes. Flip steaks, keeping the bones facing fire. Cover and continue to cook until steaks register 95 degrees, 10 to 20 minutes.

4. If using charcoal, slide steaks to hotter side of grill. If using gas, remove steaks from the grill, turn primary burner to high, and heat until hot, about 5 minutes; place steaks over primary burner. Cover and cook until well browned and steaks register 120 to 125 degrees (for medium-rare) about 4-minutes per side. Transfer steaks to a clean wire rack set in rimmed baking sheet, tent with aluminum foil, and let rest for 15-minutes. Transfer steaks to carving board, meat from bone, and slice into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Serve.

Grilled Asparagus

Serves 4 to 6
Use asparagus that is at least 1/2 inch thick near the base. Do not use pencil-thin asparagus; it can not withstand the heat and will overcook. Age affects the of asparagus enormously. For the sweetest taste, look for spears that bright green and firm, with tightly closed tips.

1 1/2 pounds thick asparagus spears, trimmed
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
3 minced garlic cloves
Salt and pepper

1A FOR A CHARCOAL GRILL Open bottom vent completely. Light large chimney starter three-quarters filled with charcoal briquettes (4 1/2 quarts). When top coals are partially covered with ash, pour evenly over grill. Set cooking grate in place, cover, and open lid vent completely. Heat grill until hot, about 5 minutes.

1B FOR A GAS GRILL Turn all burners high, cover, and heat grill until hot, about 15 minutes. Turn all burners to medium-high.

2 Brush asparagus with melted butter and season with salt and pepper.

3 Clean and oil cooking grate. Place asparagus in even layer on grill and until just tender and browned, 4-10 minutes, turning halfway through cooking. Transfer asparagus to platter and serve.

This post was written in partnership with America’ Test Kitchen. All thoughts and opinions are mine.Master Of The Grill